Famous Horse Partners in History – El Cid and Babieca

March 10 2016 - 1Welcome back to the Famous Horse Partners in History Series.

This post is about the famous Spanish Warrior and El Cid and his horse Babieca in the 11th Century.

Babieca, born of the noble Iberian breed of horse now called the Andalusian, started life as a weakling cast off, but soon became one of Spain’s most honored horses of history. Born in a Carthusian monastery, an order of monks who were reputed to breed and raise the finest horses in Europe, Babieca came into the world spindly and weak. Seen as worthless by the monks, the young colt seemed nothing but a liability.

One of the monks, Pedro El Grande, named for his largess, had a beloved nephew named Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, born of a noble Castillian family. When Rodrigo became of age, Pedro El Grande told him that he could choose any horse from his fine stables to raise as his own. Much to the monk’s surprise, Rodrigo picked the little weakling colt his uncle had named Babieca – fool or stupid.

As Rodrigo grew to become a fierce and well-respected soldier, Babieca grew to be a well trained and devoted war-horse, and a testament to the Carthusian reputation. Does this story sound familiar? Much like the story of Alexander the Great and his steed Bucephalus, the story of Rodrigo and Babieca has been told throughout history and perhaps both stories became infused with one another. Both horses, one mighty and black, and the other fierce and white, became great warhorses and outlived their human partners.

Rodrigo, who became known as El Cid Campeador, (Lord, Champion of Warriors) so named by his enemies, fought both the Christian kings and Muslim invaders throughout his lifetime. His greatest feat was retaking Valencia from the Moors, returning it to Spain, and then later saving it from siege in his most famous, and last, battle.

El Cid carried a legendary sword, almost as famous as his horse, said to be made of Damascus steel, called Tizona. During the siege of Valencia, El Cid fell in battle. The invaders, hearing of his death, gathered their soldiers and planned to take the city. Without their leader, El Cid’s men feared they would lose, so they strapped El Cid’s corpse to the saddle of Babieca, fixed Tizona into his hand and propped his arm toward the heavens. Babieca, well-trained in the art of war, led El Cid’s men into the battlefield. Dumbfounded by seeing their enemy risen from the dead, the Moors scattered in terror. Eventually, Spain was reclaimed.

After the death of El Cid, Babieca was never ridden again and died two years later at the age of 40, a remarkably long life for a horse who’d seen so many battles.

Strongly built, and compact yet elegant, Andalusians are know for their athleticism, intelligence, sensitivity and loyalty. Their coats are most commonly grey, but can be found in many other colors and they are quite regal with their long, thick manes and tails.

Please enjoy this video featuring the beautiful Andalusian Horse.

NICLA Property Consultancy

Information gathered from “The Supreme War Horse of Spain” by John Reismiller and “The Legend of El Cid and Babieca – Andalusians in History and Mythology” published in Andalusian World.

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