Category Archives: SHARING

Writing A Book: What Does it Take?

If you have always wanted to write a book but haven’t started yet, you might wonder what does it take?

One of the things you have to ask yourself is WHY you want to write a book. Is it because you have a good idea or have a message you want to share with the world? Is it because you want fame and fortune? Is it because you think it is easy and fun, but you just haven’t taken the time to do it yet?

Coming to terms with your reasons for pursuing such a time consuming task is important. As I mentioned in my article “Why Do You Want to Write?” writing is an emotional endeavor. “Whether you write fiction or non-fiction, want to educate or entertain, the end goal is to stimulate an emotional reaction or response from your readers. The fastest and easiest way to do this is to understand your own emotions and what brings you to the computer or the notebook to put your thoughts, emotions, knowledge and stories on the page.” [https://karibovee.com/why-do-you-want-to-write/]

Most successful writers write because they have no choice. It is a part of who they are, part of their identity. It is  their chosen way to communicate their ideas, messages, and dreams to the world. For most writers, writing is a PASSION. They pursue writing and a career in writing as a life-long commitment and cannot imagine a world in which they don’t write. Other people feel that they have a book in them and want to write and publish that one book. In either case, each type of writer’s reasons are not to be diminished or taken lightly because writing a book, and more importantly finishing a book, takes a lot of planning, discipline and commitment. To write a book and write it well, you must be completely invested in your project until it comes to fruition. Completing a book can take a few as several weeks (yes, I know people who have written and finished their books in a matter of weeks) to several years, even decades in some instances.

Whether writing is a passion for you, and you do it every day of your life, or if it is the means to an end for getting your particular story or message out to the world, writing a book takes a certain kind of fortitude that doesn’t come easily to everyone.

Most successful writers are avid and voracious readers. They have a love of the written word and can’t wait to get lost in a story or a message or a particular method or philosophy. They also know the importance of reading genres or books that are much like the book they want to write. Successful writers also know the value in reading and learning from books that are not in their particular genre, or even in books that highlight a topic they have no interest in—books that stretch their thinking, their learning, and their area of expertise.

One of the most important factors in writing a book, finishing a book, or pursuing a lifetime of writing books, is for the writer to give himself/herself permission to pursue their craft. A writer must first take themselves seriously as a writer and give themselves the time and space to work on their book.

Finding both physical and mental space to write is supremely important. Seek out a place where you can be undisturbed and focused. It can be a corner of your room, an entire office, the family’s dining room table, or your local coffee shop or book store. Pick a place that makes you feel good, inspired, and productive.

Finding mental space can be a bit more challenging. The writer must allow himself/herself time to write. Many writers write every day, but it isn’t always necessary. You must find time where you can, and I would suggest making a date with yourself to write or schedule a time in your calendar to write and treat that time as you would any other appointment. Canceling or not showing up would be rude, right? Don’t do that to yourself!

Sometimes it is too easy for us to put our writing on the back-burner or to make it the last thing on our to-do list. Until you become a professional writer, you generally aren’t getting paid to produce, so it can be difficult to make it a priority. But, to write and finish a book, you have to make yourself and your project a priority. You work hard at your day job, hard for your family and friends, hard at your volunteer efforts. Why wouldn’t you work hard for yourself? Treat writing as your reward for all that you do for others. After all, you deserve it!

So, what does it take? There are many components that go into producing a good book like understanding why you want to write the book and then allowing yourself the time and space to do so. In the next several months I will be writing more articles like this one to help you on your journey to writing and finishing your book. I hope you join me and I look forward to your comments!

 

 

Origins of Christmas Traditions – 5 Things You May Not Know About Christmas!

#1. Jolly St. Nick:

National Philoptochos Society
National Philoptochos Society

Much unlike the stories of Santa Claus who resides at the North Pole, the history of the beloved “jolly old elf” actually has its origins in the Mediterranean in the 4th century. St. Nikolas of Myra, now modern-day Demre, Turkey, was a Greek Bishop known for the many miracles he performed and also for his benevolence toward children. One tale recounts that he saved three young girls from a fate of prostitution when he had 3 bags of gold secretly delivered to their parents. Another story tells of Nikolas entering an inn whose inn keeper had just murdered three boys, sliced them up, and pickled them in barrels. Somehow, Nikolas sensed this horrific crime and resurrected the three boys. For these miracles he was deemed the patron saint of children. Nikolas, eventually named Nicholas, is also the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, repentant theives, children, brewers, pawnbrokers and students in various cities and countries around Europe.

#2. Oh, Tannenbaum:

http://www.historic-uk.com/assets/Images/victoriaalberttree.gif?1390899961
http://www.historic-uk.com/assets/Images/victoriaalberttree.gif?1390899961

By the middle ages, the legend of Jesus’ birth had grown. Although the bible doesn’t state exactly when Jesus was born, ancient peoples associated his birth with the winter solstice, the shortest and darkest day of the year. After the Christ child was born, he gave new light to the world and it is said that all of the trees throughout the world shook off the ice and snow that had settled on their branches revealing new shoots of green. Many ancient peoples used evergreen branches to decorate their homes, and in the 16th century people started setting up Paradise Trees—associated with Adam and Eve’s Day, December 24—laden with fruits. During that century, some say the first person to bring Christmas Trees into the home was the German preacher Martin Luther. In fact, the Christmas Tree has  strong historical roots in Germany with the medieval German Mystery or Miracle Plays that were acted out in front of churches on Christmas Eve. Decorated trees were paraded around town to advertise the play. Christmas Trees became more popular in the Victorian period when the German Prince Albert and his wife Queen Victoria of England erected a Christmas Tree in Windsor Castle for their children. In 1848, a drawing of “The Queen’s Christmas Tree at Windsor Castle” was published in the London News. In December of 1850 the illustration was published in Godey’s Lady’s Book, Philadelphia, giving rise to the popularity of Christmas Trees in America.

#3. Away In A Manger:

Nativity - http://www.dominicansmacau.org
Nativity – http://www.dominicansmacau.org

The Nativity Scenes that we see all over different countries in churches and homes has its origins in Italy in the 13th Century. In 1223, St. Francis of Assissi made a pilgrimage to Bethlehem. While there he visited the historical cave that housed the rustic stable where Jesus was born. It is believed that Francis was so moved by the place that he was inspired to recreate the scene for a special Mass on Christmas Eve. He held this Mass in a cave in Greccio, Italy, where he set up an empty manger or feeding trough and brought in a live ox and a donkey to more accurately recreate the first Christmas night. He is said to have wanted to do something so that people would remember the simplicity and poverty in which this child had been born, and for his people to remember the true reason for Christmas celebration.

#4 Itsy Bitsy Spider:

Ukrainian Spider Web Christmas Ornament - https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com
Ukrainian Spider Web Christmas Ornament – https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com

I don’t know about you, but I have never associated Christmas with spiders. However, tinsel for the Christmas Tree has its origins in spider’s webs and is reported to have come from legends in Northern European countries such as Germany, Ukraine, Finland and Scandinavia. Most of these legends center around a poor family who cannot afford decorations for their Christmas tree, which in some tales grew from a pine cone in their house and in others was brought in by the family. When the household goes to sleep, a spider housed in the tree, covers it with intricately designed cobwebs. By the time the family rises in the morning, the spider’s beautiful webs have magically turned to strands of silver and gold. Some people believed that St. Nicholas’ magical powers turned the web to precious metals and others say it was the magical powers of the light of the sun. Apparently, it is considered good luck in parts of Poland, Germany and Ukraine to find a spider or spider’s web on your Christmas tree. Spider’s Web ornaments called ‘pavuchy’ (little spider) made of paper and silver wire are very popular in those countries.

 

#5 God Bless Us Everyone:

http://f.tqn.com/y/classiclit/1/L/q/q/2/4_scrooge.jpg
http://f.tqn.com/y/classiclit/1/L/q/q/2/4_scrooge.jpg

One of my favorite Christmas stories is A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Like many of his works, Dicken’s A Christmas Carol was written as a commentary on specific social issues of the day, particularly the plight of the poor and the brutality of child labor. When Charles was 11, his family was imprisoned in Marshalsea debtors’ prision in Southwark, London because of his father’s mounting debts from living beyond his means. It was up to young Charles to leave school to help pay the family’s debt and he was soon employed at Warren’s Blacking Warehouse where he worked 10 hours a day pasting labels on pots of boot blacking. When he first set out to work on the project that was to become the beloved story we know today, he intended for it to be a pamphlet entitled “An Appeal to the People of England on behalf of the Poor Man’s Child,” but decided that he could reach the hearts of more people by telling the story symbolizing the harshness of government and the rich in Ebenezer Scrooge toward innocent families and children in the lovely Cratchit family. It was a decision that produced an immediate and timeless best-seller, followed by print, stage and theater productions.

I hope you have learned something new and heart-warming about some of these Christmas traditions. I wish you all a very Merry Christmas and joyous Holiday season!

 

Sources:

“Christmas in Italy,” Christmas Around the World—Why Christmas.comhttp://www.whychristmas.com/cultures/italy.shtml

“Why Do We Have Christmas Trees?” Edwin and Jennifer Woodruff Tait, Christian History, December 2008 http://www.christianitytoday.com/history/2008/december/why-do-we-have-christmas-trees.html

“Saint Nicholas to Santa: The Surprising Mr. Claus, Brian Handwerk, National Geographic, December 20, 2013 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/12/131219-santa-claus-origin-history-christmas-facts-st-nicholas.html

“Pagan Roots? 5 Surprising Facts About Christmas,” Stephanie Pappas, Live Science, December 22, 2012 http://www.livescience.com/25779-christmas-traditions-history-paganism.html

“The Real Reason Charles Dickens Wrote A Christmas Carol,” John Brioch, Time.com, http://time.com/4597964/history-charles-dickens-christmas-carol/

 

Ghosts in the Land of Enchantment

Having been born and raised in New Mexico, I grew up hearing stories of New Mexico’s history, its multi-cultural legends and its haunting ghost stories. Infused with lore from the Mexican, Spanish, Native American and Anglo cultures, I can tell you, New Mexico’s past is alive and well, even in the modern age.

Perhaps the most famous ghost of New Mexico is La Llarona (The Weeping Woman). We share her with many states in the southwest and even in parts of Europe and Latin America. Texas, Arizona and New Mexico all claim La Llarona as their own, and we will probably never know where she actually originated, but her story is no less haunting, no matter where she came from.

llorona1
livepuntamita.com

Some tales say she was an Aztec woman named La Malinche who became the lover of Hernan Cortes, the Conquistador who came to the Americas in the 16th century to help Spain gather new territories and build a new empire. La Malinche had two sons by Cortes and the couple was reputed to be very happy. However, as one story goes, the King and Queen of Spain feared that Cortes would attempt to build his own empire and they demanded he return to Spain. When he refused, they sent a very rich and beautiful Spanish lady to the Americas to seduce him and bring him back. The ruse worked, but Cortes would not leave without his sons. On the night of his departure back to Spain, La Malinche, crazed with jealousy and grief, took back her sons, stabbed them in the heart and threw them in the nearby lake. This particular story says she lived another ten years, but throughout that decade was seen on the beach of the lake moaning, “Oh, hijos mios!” (Oh my children)

The first documented appearance of La Llorona after La Malinche’s death occurs in Mexico City in 1550 where she is said to wander the streets in a white dress on nights with a full moon, wailing and looking for her children. Sightings of La Llorona spread throughout the Americas, with each town or city claiming she is local to their area.

Other tales claim that La Llarona was a woman named Maria who fell in love with a noble man of Spanish descent and had two children by him. When it came time for the man to marry, his family would not accept Maria, so he refused to marry her. He would often visit with his new wife to see his children, but he would pay no attention to Maria. Angry and jealous, Maria drowned her children in the river and then drowned herself, full of grief and regret for her act. Since then, she wanders the banks of the river crying for her children.

Acquecia near the Rio Grande
Acquecia near the Rio Grande

I grew up with the latter tale. Our house was built next to the main irrigation ditch that flanks the Rio Grande. When I heard wailing cries in the night, I’d run to my parent’s bedroom. My father would explain that the sound came from the packs of coyotes that ran the ditch banks, but to this day, I’m pretty sure it was La Llarona crying for her lost children.

Many of New Mexico’s old hotels are said to be haunted. One of the most famous is the St. James Hotel in Cimarron. The St. James, once the Lambert Inn, was built in 1872 by a Frenchman named Henri Lambert. Lambert, personal chef to President Abraham Lincoln, decided upon Lincoln’s assassination to move west in search of gold. He first settled in Elizabethtown, New Mexico, but ended up in Cimarron where he built the Lambert Inn, a saloon for cowboys, traders and miners. The saloon became so popular that Henri decided to add guest rooms and made it one of the most elegant hotels west of the Mississippi River.

Many famous guests came to stay at the hotel including Wyatt Earp, Jesse James, Doc Holliday, Billy the Kid, Pat Garret, Lew Wallace, and famous author Zane Grey. Other distinguished guests included Buffalo Bill Cody and, one of my favorites, Annie Oakley. The first three books of my Annie Oakley mystery series do not feature Annie Oakley in New Mexico, but I suppose there is always room for a fourth. Perhaps she could team up with Wyatt Earp to track down the notorious criminals and murders that were have said to stay at the Lambert Inn. Back in the late 1800’s law and order were in short supply in New Mexico. It is reported that over 26 men were shot and killed within the Inn’s adobe walls. When Lambert’s sons replaced the roof in 1901, they found more than 400 bullet holes in the saloon’s ceiling. A double layer of heavy wood prevented the guests upstairs from harm.

St. James Hotel, Cimarron, New Mexico TripAdvisor.com
St. James Hotel, Cimarron, New Mexico
TripAdvisor.com

Many of those gunslingers are said to still haunt the place. In fact, the spiritual activity of the hotel is so well known, it has been featured on the television shows Unsolved Mysteries and A Current Affair. Psychics who have visited the hotel have identified the strong presence of at least three restless spirits inhabiting the hotel today. One of them is the ghost of Thomas James Wright who bled to death from a gunshot wound in Room 18 of the hotel. Reportedly, Wright had just won the rights to the hotel in a poker game and as he made his way up to his room, someone shot him in the back. He continued to the room and died there, but apparently he hasn’t left. One former owner said she often saw an orange light floating in the upper corner of the room and was once pushed down while cleaning the room. Room 18 now remains locked. Rumors have flown about a number of mysterious deaths occurring in that same room before it was permanently inaccessible to guests.

Henri’s second wife, Mary Elizabeth has been said to haunt Room 17 since her death there in 1926. Staff and guests have reported the aroma of Mary’s rose scented perfume and an incessant tapping on the window occurs if the window is open. Once it is closed, the tapping stops.

Objects from many of the rooms and the common areas have turned up missing only to be found in an area where they don’t belong. This is supposedly the work of a little “dwarf-like” man who has also been seen at the hotel. The staff have nicknamed him the “Little Imp.” Once while two of the former owners stood in conversation in one of the rooms of the hotel, he was said to have tossed a knife, it’s blade point landing in the wooden floor between them.

Cold spots, lights turning on and off, electrical equipment behaving strangely and items falling from walls and shelves have also been reported at the hotel. I have not yet been to the St. James, but now that I have potential plans for a fourth book in the Annie Oakley mystery series, I may have to investigate. I wonder if there is a Holiday Inn next door?

 

 

 

Hawaii’s Haunted Past – A Look Into Hawaii’s Ghosts

Last week I wrote about some of Hawaii’s ancient legends and the ghosts that haunt them in an article called “October and the Ghosts of Hawaii’s past.”  (https://karibovee.com/2016/10/04/october-and-the-ghosts-of-hawaiis-past/) . The stories highlighted take place in village of Kailua-Kona, but this week I want to write about some of the ghosts a few miles south along the craggy shoreline.

Ancient heiau on the Kona coast
Ancient heiau on the Kona coast

The Big Island of Hawaii is an archaeologist’s treasure trove. Its past is filled with legendary battles, death penalties for crimes, and human sacrifice. Bones litter the Island in sacred heiaus and burial grounds. Human habitation of the Big Island is said to have dated back as early as 400 CE when Polynesians traveled there, over 2000 miles from their homeland of the Marquesas Islands (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/hawaii-history-and-heritage-4164590/?no-ist). None of Hawaii’s ancient dead were buried at sea, and the ground, all lava rock, made it difficult for deep underground burial without modern machinery. Generations of bones scatter the island.

There are so many bones littering the island that buying and building real estate can be challenging because so much of the land is protected. Archaeologists are continuously called in to assess properties for possible burials. No surprise that many island hauntings have been sited and documented by locals and tourists. The island is also a highly spiritual place and its people have strong traditions in folklore, mythical legends and old religions. In my book Bones of the Redeemed, soon to be completed, my protagonist, Annie Delgado, a doctoral student of Archaeology in New Mexico, must also deal with strong spiritual and superstitious beliefs when she encounters a secret religious society in an ancient land also infused with a mystical and magical past.

The site of the Sheraton Kona Hotel, formerly the Keauhou Bay Resort, and once called the Kona Surf (torn down 2004), juts out onto the jagged lava cliffs of the Kona Lagoon. A tranquil spot, it is no wonder the ancient Alii, or Hawaiian royalty came to this place to rest and play. Guests and employees of the old Kona Surf Hotel told stories of hearing two little girls running and playing in the hallways in the middle of the night. When security was called to investigate, no one could be found. There is an ancient Hawaiian legend that says that site was the dwelling place of twin sisters, ancient supernatural beings, who took the form of lizards.

Others have seen a ghost standing on the cliff in front of the hotel who disappears into thin air. The area is also the site of two ancient heiaues – platforms made of volcanic rock for spiritual rites and human sacrifice. When the Kona Surf Hotel was torn down in 2004, the heiaues were resurrected in hopes of appeasing the gods, and now, still stand. Walking upon the ground of these and all heiaues is greatly frowned upon, and the trespasser might well fall into unfortunate circumstances.

Hillside of Lekeleke where ancient bodies rest in peace
Hillside of Lekeleke where ancient bodies rest in peace

Nearby, at Lekeleke, also situated on the lagoon, is the site of the famous final battle fought on the island of Hawaii. The Great Kamehameha ruled the Islands under the Kapu system – an ancient, sacred code of laws that directed religious practices and a way of life for the Hawaiians.

Influenced by the Christian missionaries who landed on the island in 1820, Liholiho (King Kamehameha II), the Great Kamehameha’s heir, abandoned the Kapu system. To show his power, he committed the bold act of eating a meal with his mother, Queen Ka’ahumanu. Kamehameha I’s nephew, Kekuaokalani was outraged at the abolishment of the ancient way of life, and demanded that the Kapu system be reinforced. Liholio refused and the great final battle of Kuamo’o began. Three hundred Hawaiian warriors, including Kekuaokalni and his wife, died at the site, along with the ancient Kapu system. Today, terraces built into the lava cliffside still hold the bones of those warriors.

 

City of Refuge, Hawaii http://www.explore-the-big-island.com/puuhonua-o-honaunau.html

One of the most magical places on the Island, in my opinion, is Puuhonua O Honaunau, or the City of Refuge, a tranquil spot on the coast in Captain Cook, HI, about 15 miles from Kailua-Kona.

The laws under the ancient Kapu system were strict. Standing too close to the chief, walking across his shadow, touching his possessions, or walking in his footsteps were some of the offenses worthy of death. Violating these kapus, among others like men and women eating together, were said to incur the wrath of the gods. If unfortunate enough to break the kapu for any reason, one would be hunted down and killed—unless they reached Puuhonua, the place of refuge. There a priest, or kahuna, could absolve the offender of his or her transgression, purify them and send them home. Puuhonua was also a place for defeated warriors or innocents in war time to take refuge during times of battle. Those who did not make it there in time are said to be spirits wandering the site in need of purification or rescue.

City of Refuge. View out to sea
City of Refuge. View out to sea.

I have visited three places in the world that have spoken to me in a deeply profound and spiritual way. Puuhonua, the City of Refuge is one of them. Whenever I visit the island, which is about three times a year, I always make time for that magical place. As I walk around the ancient ruins of the Alii palace, built behind a wall of the refuge, and look toward the tranquil bay on one side, and out into the sea on the other, I can feel the presence of lost souls searching for peace. I may not have seen the ghosts, but I have felt them. There is a tranquility and comfort at Puuhonua that I find hard to put into words. Not all ghosts are scary.

History is full of ghosts, and like the archaeologist in my book, I love to delve into the past of magical and mystical worlds. When I return home to the Land of Enchantment, I would like to share some of its past history and ghosts with you—for October is the time of year for ghost stories.

October and the Ghosts of Hawaii’s Past

In many places in the United States, the month of October brings the turning of leaves, crisp air at sunrise, elongated shadows in the early evenings and the urge to pull sweaters, hats and boots out of the closet. In my home state of New Mexico, October is always  my favorite time of year when I like to take my horses out on long trail rides along the Rio Grande, enjoy Albuquerque’s world renown Hot Air Balloon Fiesta, and revisit the rich ghost stories of old New Mexico.

This year, my husband and I decided to spend the early part of October at our home in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, to cheer on the athletes participating in the Ironman World Championship, another world renown October event. No turning leaves, crisp air, elongated shadows or hot air balloons, and definitely no desire to wear a sweater occurs here, but one thing is still the same—the wealth of ghost stories that abound in such an old, spiritual place.

I’ve been learning about the many ghosts that reside on the Big Island since I’ve been researching a mystery series I hope to start sometime next year. My protagonist is a young woman who travels to the Island of Hawaii in the late 1920’s to escape a scandal involving a young man far beneath her station (according to her parents) and the possibility of a love child. She comes to the Island, lives at the Kona Inn on Alii Drive, and starts a newspaper. Oh, and of course, – she acquires a horse that she rides all over the island to find her stories of murder and intrigue. That is all I’m going to tell you – you’ll have to read the series when it comes out to learn more!

historickailuavillage.com
Hulihe’e Palace

I had hoped that I would find a story about a ghost living at the Kona Inn, but none could be found. However, it is reported that some ghosts do reside right down the street. In fact, two are said to live next door at the Hulihe’e Palace. The Palace, built in 1838 was eventually passed on to Princess Ruth Ke’eikolani in 1848, who opened it up to the Hawaiian Royal Family and other reigning monarchs, to use as a summer home. (She herself preferred to sleep in a grass hut on the Palace grounds near the sound of the crashing waves.) One of the ghosts, a young boy has been seen playing on the Palace grounds, or heard stomping up and down the stairs. It is thought that he might be the ghost of Prince Albert, the son of King Kamehameha III and godson of Queen Victoria, who died of appendicitis at age 4.

Princess Kaiulani
Princess Kaiulani

A ghostly young woman in a white gown has also been seen at the Palace. Many think it is the spirit of the beautiful Princess Ka’iulani, who also died at a tragically young age, 27, from illness caused by complications of thyroid disease.

A bit further north on Alii Drive brings us to one of the most important historical sites on the island; Kamakahonu, the bay of King Kamehameha I’s final residence. The hotel situated adjacent to this sacred place is the King Kamehameha Kona Beach Hotel, also home to a number of ghosts. Guests of the hotel have reported hearing footsteps, chanting, and battle cries. During his reign Kamehameha I rebuilt Ahu’ena Heiau, a temple next to where the hotel is located, dedicated to the Hawaiian god of peace, Lono. Kamehameha spent many hours in the temple with his councilmen chanting ritual prayers. Perhaps those prayers echo out over the water, disturbing hotel guests. Other guests claim that the portrait of Queen Lili’uokalani on the bottom floor gallery of the hotel is so lifelike they have seen her image breathing, leading some to believe that the painting itself is haunted.

"Breathing" portrait of Queen Liliuokalani
“Breathing” portrait of Queen Liliuokalani

Though Hawaii might not be filled with the rich colors of fall, it is always filled with the spirit of endless summer and a rich cultural past full of legends and myth. Come back next week for more history and mystery of the ghosts of Kailu-Kona, Hawaii.

 

The Parelli Savvy Summit: The Land of Milk and Honey for Equestrians

 

Earlier this month I had the great pleasure of attending the 2016 Parelli Savvy Summit ( http://www.parelli.com/-2016parellisavvysummit.html), and celebrating their 20th anniversary of this amazing event at the Parelli Ranch in Pagosa Springs, Colorado—the land of milk and honey. For some reason, I have always referred to the Parelli Ranch as “the land of milk and honey”, and I recently asked myself why? The first image that popped into my mind was A.A. Milne’s, Winnie the Pooh—a beautiful series of books my father read to me almost every night as a child— and the loveable bear’s search for “hunny” in the Hundred Acre Wood. Winnie the Pooh was never happier than when he was scooping honey out of a honey tree, or had his nose stuck in a pot of the sticky gooey stuff.

Parelli Instructors representing the 378 Parelli Professionals from over 20 countries. Photo by Matylda Smith 2016
Parelli Instructors representing the 378 Parelli Professionals in over 20 countries. Photo by Matylda Smith 2016.

Unable to fully reconcile my connection with the ranch to Winnie the Pooh, I decided to look up the phrase land of milk and honey on the Internet. My favorite definition that came up was from the website Culinary Lore (www.culinarylore.com/food-history). It explains: Land of milk and honey is a literary expression that comes from one of the greatest works of literature ever written, the Bible. In Exodus, when God instructs Moses to lead his people, the oppressed Hebrew slaves of Egypt, out of bondage and into freedom. He promises them their own land. He does not tell them exactly what land, but describes it as a land flowing with milk and honey.

Again, maybe a stretch on the connection with the ranch, but upon further introspection, perhaps not so much. The key word in this phrase to me is “freedom.” Pat Parelli often refers to the ranch as “The Eagle’s Nest.” The eagle represents freedom and liberty, doesn’t it?

As Linda Parelli often says, “How interesting!”

Now, it makes complete sense to me. In my mind and experience, the Parelli Ranch IS the land of milk and honey, because there, I have learned to break free of my previous “assumptions” about horses and how to work and play with them. Most importantly, I have learned to break free from the assumptions I have made about myself. Horses have the ability and power to transform lives. By studying them, so can we. If we tune into our “natural” selves, and appreciate the natural power of horses and working in natural partnership with them, we can free ourselves from our preconceived notions and beliefs about ourselves, others, and the world around us.

One of the most inspiring demonstrations at the Summit this year was the spotlight session with Caton Parelli, Pat’s son. Thirty-three years ago, Caton was born with hydrocephalus—fluid on the brain, and the condition left him with extremely limited body function. The doctors told Pat and his former wife, Caton’s mother, that it would be best if they institutionalized Caton. Pat refused. Not only did he refuse to sequester his child from the world, he decided to put him on a horse. Pat strapped Caton to the saddle with a seatbelt of sorts. While mounted and holding the lead rope of Caton’s horse (a term called pony-ing) Pat and Caton took to the fields and mountains, riding and herding cattle. Unfortunately, when Caton was 12 years old, he suffered a stroke caused by his condition. A blood clot had traveled from his lungs to his brain, rendering the left side of his body completely immobile. Again, Pat and Caton remained undeterred, and Caton continued to ride and play with horses, activities that eventually helped him to regain his mobility. Since then, he has competed in branding, reining, roping and cutting competitions.

14249697_1396149987081103_8762103147591241831_o
Caton Parelli. Photo by Matylda Smith 2016.

During the Summit Spotlight, Caton and his mount cut a cow from the herd. Pat challenged Caton to run alongside the cow and lean down and touch her between the ears. Sounds easy, right? As Caton and his horse sped around the arena chasing down the cow, the crowd cheered with abandon. After several adrenaline rushing laps, Caton was able to reach down and touch the cow on its hind quarters. He didn’t touch the cow’s head, but no one cared. In those moments, we all not only saw, but lived through, the difficulty of the challenge—a tough one even for a perfectly abled-bodied person. The moment Caton’s fingers finally touched that cow, the crowd roared and rose to its feet in thunderous applause. Once the ovation subsided, Pat said to the crowd, face beaming, something to the effect of, “I don’t have a handicapped child. He’s a horseman.”

Horses can heal, and this was one of the highlights of the event this year.

Caton is but one of the many examples of the healing power of horses you will find anywhere in the world. In the last two articles in my blog, “The True Measure of a Champion is What is in Her Heart”(https://karibovee.com/2016/09/07/the-true-measure-of-a-champion-is-what-is-in-her-heart/) and “Para-Equestrian Dressage Begins at the Paralympic Games” (https://karibovee.com/2016/09/10/usa-para-equestrian-dressage-team/) about Para-Equestrian Olympians, I highlighted five amazing athletes with major physical challenges who competed in the top equestrian sport in the world, the Para-Equestrian Dressage competition during the Paralympic Games. Each one of these athletes has had to overcome many incredible physical challenges, and they have done it with the partnership and love of their respective horses.

The Parelli Ranch. Photo by Kari Bovee

Come to think of it, perhaps Winnie the Pooh does have a connection to the land of milk and honey, or rather the Parelli Ranch. Pooh lived a pretty carefree and simple life in the Hundred Acre Wood, free from preconceived notions and assumptions about things. Through his characters, A.A. Milne approached common human problems in life with a philosophy built on nature, purity of heart, and simplicity. His characters were all animals that facilitated lessons and experiences for Christopher Robin, their human, just like the horse does for many who use equine therapy to learn and heal.

 

 

 

The True Measure of A Champion Is What Is In Her Heart

Champions are the type of people who have chosen a road less traveled. They have sacrificed their time, money, and sometimes their relationships, to achieve their championship dreams. There is a certain drive and force of will these people have that not everyone is fortunate enough, or strong enough, to foster.

As we are in the midst of the Olympic season, first with the Games in August, and now with the Paralympics starting this week, we get to see these champions doing what they do best, at the peak of their performance, competing for the elusive Holy Grail of all awards, the Olympic Gold Medal.

LONDON, ENGLAND 01/09/2012 - Lauren Barwick, riding Off to Paris, in the Dressage Individual Championship Test - Grade II Final at the London 2012 Paralympic Games in Greenwich Park. (Photo: Phillip MacCallum/Canadian Paralympic Committee)
LONDON, ENGLAND 01/09/2012 – Lauren Barwick, riding Off to Paris, in the Dressage Individual Championship Test – Grade II Final at the London 2012 Paralympic Games in Greenwich Park. (Photo: Phillip MacCallum/Canadian Paralympic Committee)

Athletes of this caliber are indeed special, but one in particular stands out to me: Canadian Paralympian Lauren Barwick. Lauren is a 4-time World Para-Equestrian athlete and 3-time Paralympic medalist, having earned gold and silver medals in the Paralympic Games in Beijing (2008). In 2008 and 2014 she was named
Canada’s Equestrian of the Year and in 2015, she was inducted into Canada’s Paralympic Hall of Fame. All amazing achievements, yes, and all from a person who has no feeling below her belly button and paralyzed legs. It seems mind boggling, but what draws me to Lauren is her devotion to and passion for natural horsemanship. In addition to all of her monumental achievements, Lauren is a Parelli 4-Star Senior Instructor and Horse Development Specialist.

Lauren was introduced to the Parelli Program before her tragic accident. As a jumper, she appreciated the methods and learned the hallmark Parelli Seven Games. But, like many of us, at first, she didn’t take it too seriously, and just had fun with it. At 22 years of age, while training to perform stunts with horses for the movie industry, Lauren climbed to the top of a pile of 100-pound stacked hay bales at feeding time. The stack was unstable so she jumped 10 feet to the ground and one of the top bales fell on her spine, paralyzing her from the waist down. Lauren thought she would never ride again. Three weeks later, she was allowed home for a visit, and wheeled herself down to the pasture to see her horses. Only one approached her, unafraid of the contraption she had to sit in for the rest of her life. Her horse, Peanut, had not forgotten her owner, and as horses are so apt to do once a bond is created. Peanut loved and missed Lauren unconditionally. After that, Lauren felt she might be able to ride again.

In 2002, just two years after her injury, Lauren hired a trainer and began competing internationally, representing her country. She was nominated for and began training for the Para-Equestrian 2004 Paralympics in Athens, where she came very close to achieving Top 3 in the dressage competition. In 2005, Lauren realized that she no longer wanted to train the way she had trained for Athens and wanted more of a partnership with her horses. It was then that she reached out to Pat and Linda Parelli and began her natural horsemanship journey once again. Still with no aspirations to continue on to Beijing in 2008, Lauren went to the Parelli Colorado campus for a two-week audition to become a part of Pat’s barn. Lauren says that after seven days of riding with Pat in the mountains, she was inspired again to see how far she could go with her horses. She moved to Florida to train at the Florida campus with the goal of competing in the 2008 Beijing Summer Paralympics. It was through Pat and Linda that she found her Paralympic horse, Maile, and realized her Olympic dreams. Lauren has another shot at the gold this year at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, September 7-18, with her horse Onyx.

Lauren inspires me in so many ways. She has overcome what seemed to be insurmountable odds to achieve her goals, but it wasn’t enough. She wanted to be a better partner to her horses. She wanted to be completely involved in their training, both physically and emotionally. Although I have no aspirations to achieve what Lauren has in her equestrian career, I can relate to her desire to want more than the ribbon. She wanted those awards to really mean something, from her heart. She wanted to be able to foster a deep and meaningful relationship with more than just one “good” horse. She wanted to prove to herself that she had the heart and the desire to be the best partner she could be to a number of horses. Regardless of what she may do in Rio this summer, in that she truly has succeeded.

Sources: LaurenBarwick.com, Dressagetoday.com, Parelli Success Stories, Parelli Tube,https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feUNKXrWNPE

Olympic Spotlight: Parade of Nations Features Equestrians as Flag-bearers

It is a shame that Olympic Equestrians do not get as much attention as the other athletes at the Summer Games. As I mentioned in my previous article, “Equestrianism in the Olympics”, (https://karibovee.com/2016/08/11/equestrianism-at-the-olympics/) these athletes have much more to contend with than the other athletes because they also have to take into consideration the care and well-being of their equine partner—a partner who really has no choice or say as to whether they are to compete or not.

It was especially moving when Dutch dressage rider Adelinde Cornelissen, a previous Olympic medalist, gave up her Rio Olympic dream of winning the gold because she felt her partner Parzival, a chestnut gelding, was not up to the task. It was determined that Parzival had suffered an insect bite, which caused a fever and swelling in his jaw. Once he had been cleared by the vet, Adelinde was ready to perform, but ended up retiring mid-test, because she knew her horse was suffering. That is the act of a true champion.

While the Equestrian events are not given prime-time television and press coverage, their efforts and talents are appreciated by many viewers and fans.

I was pleased to see that four equestrians, all show Jumpers, were given the spotlight during the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics Parade of Nations when they were honored and chosen by their countrymen and women to serve as flag-bearers. The country’s Olympic committee, the country, or the Olympic athletes themselves choose each flag-bearer–a truly special honor because only one person per country can receive this unique opportunity.

The four equestrian flag-bearers at the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics are as follows:

QATAR

Al Thani Photo: Arnd Bronkhorst/www.arnd.nl
Al Thani Photo: Arnd Bronkhorst/www.arnd.nl

Sheikh Ali Bin Khalid Al Thani represents his country, Qatar, and its Show Jumping Equestrian Team, which makes its first appearance at the Olympic games this year. The 34-year-old athlete competed at Rio as the team’s anchor. To make their goal of competing in the Olympics, the Qatar Equestrian team began training with Jan Tops of The Netherlands in 2012. With one of the world’s best-known show Jumping trainers to push them, they made their goal and the country of Qatar named Sheik Al Thani their flag-bearer. Sheikh Al Thani leads his team with experience as a two-time rider in the World Equestrian Games, and a three-time rider at the World Cup Final.

MOROCCO

Longines Global Championships www.globalchampionstour.com
Ouaddar: Longines Global Championships
www.globalchampionstour.com

Abdelkebir Ouaddar from Morocco is among one of the oldest athletes to compete in the Olympics at age 54. Raised as one of their own by the Moroccan Royal Family, Ouaddar rides several of the King’s horses for training and in competition. King Mohammed VI makes sure that Ouaddar and his horses travel with the finest of everything at their disposal. Ouaddar started competing at age 14. He was the first Moroccan to qualify for the World Championships in 2013, and the first to compete at the World Championships in Normandy in 2014. This is Ouaddar’s first Olympic Games.

THE NETHERLANDS

Dubbeldam: http://www.dagjewegblog.nl
Dubbeldam: http://www.dagjewegblog.nl

Jeroen Dubbeldam carries the flag of the Netherlands in this year’s Parade of Nations. At age 41, Dubbledam is one of the most experienced and well-respected members of the Netherlands team. He claimed an Olympic gold in 2000 at Sydney, and also the world champion gold at the World Equestrian Games in Normandy, as well as the team gold in 2006 and 2014. The Netherlands has a large presence at the 2016 games, with 239 athletes in 27 sports. To be chosen to carry the flag among all those amazing athletes gives credence to Dubbledam’s reputation as a superior sportsman.

 

 

TAIWAN

Wong: www.Zimbio.Com
Wong: www.Zimbio.Com

Isheau Wong of Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) does her country a great honor by being the first athlete in the country’s history to compete in the Equestrian portion of the Olympic games. At 27 years old, Wong won the spot to compete at the Olympics against her friend and long-time trainer, Samantha McIntosh of New Zealand. Wong tells Horsetalk.co.nz that it was tough to be McIntosh’s rival in that competition, but she put her reservations aside and just rode as fast as she could. She beat McIntosh’s time by three seconds.

I have hope that equestrian sports will be better recognized in the Olympics in the future. After all, four flag-bearers from the sport were chosen to represent their countries in the opening Parade of Nations and during the closing ceremonies for the Parade of Athletes. Despite rumors that equestrian sports would be eliminated from the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo, the Executive Board (EB) of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) decided to keep equestrian sports alive in the Olympics.

I encourage you to do what you can to further support Olympic equestrian sports, so that we may continue to be inspired by these horse and human champions who compete in perfect partnership. Enjoy the closing ceremonies—and look for our proud equestrian friends from Qatar, Morocco, The Netherlands, and Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) during the Parade of Athletes.

Meet and Greet Monday: 7/18/16

dream-big copyIt’s the Meet and Greet weekend!! Ok so here are the rules: Leave a link to your page or post in the comments of this post. Reblog this post.  It helps you, it helps me, it helps everyone!

It’s the Meet and Greet weekend!!

Ok so here are the rules:

  1. Leave a link to your page or post in the comments of this post.
  2. Reblog this post.  It helps you, it helps me, it helps everyone!
  3. Edit your reblog post and add tags.
  4. Feel free to leave your link multiple times!  It is okay to update your link for more exposure every day if you want.  It is up to you!

  5. Share this post on social media.  Many of my non-blogger friends love that I put the Meet n Greet on Facebook and Twitter because they find new blogs to follow.

Source: Meet and Greet: 7/16/16