Category Archives: BLOGGING

historical fiction books kari bovee historical mystery interview wally on the weekend

Wally on the Weekend Interview

Author Kari Bovee https://karibovee.com/

Author Kari Bovee https://karibovee.com/ visits with Wally On The Weekend about her award winning work.

Posted by Wally on the Weekend on Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Wally on the Weekend – tune in as we discuss the Annie Oakley Mystery Series, my writing and some of my recent awards!

HIstorical Fiction Books sleuth award winning kari bovee

Review of the Week – 12/11/2019

Jim Says:

HIstorical Fiction Books sleuth award winning kari bovee“A great light and fun read that will take you to the old West’s most noteworthy wild west show and meet its most famous historical figures. A whodunit mystery, Girl with a Gun doubles as historical fiction – the word fiction is emphasized. Not everything that happens in Kari Bovée’s debut novel actually happened as Annie Mosey from Ohio transitioned to “Little Miss Sure Shot” in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Readers looking for a factual account should peruse the non-fiction and biography shelves.

For those who simply want to be entertained, and get a sense of life in 1885, then stand by for a good time as bodies keep dropping, a horse gets poisoned, and attempts are made on Annie Oakley’s life. Of the three major themes in mysteries, the reader will find them all in Girl with a Gun. There are multiple instances of characters seeking revenge; characters doing bad things while they attempt to obtain something that does not belong to them; and characters wanting to stop something that is happening that they do not like. Enough intertwining of facts with fiction, of plot weaving, and characters not being all they appear to make even Agatha Christi blush.

Author Kari Bovée manages to introduce some very important, and unexpected, serious themes into Girl with a Gun. We are faced right away with the choices available to women in 1885 – marriage, the whorehouse, or an uncertain life alone. Indeed, woman’s place in society is a major refrain as Annie doesn’t even get to choose her new name when she enters the show. Abuse of women and strong prejudices against Indians illuminate the dark underside of 1885 American society.

The strong bond between horse and human is today less understood by modern society but figures as a strong motivator in the plot. And like today, everyone has secrets – some of those matter to the outcome of the mystery and others are complications and red herrings tantalizingly introduced throughout the pages in excellent fashion.

Girl with a Gun will give the reader an inside view of the historic wild west show. We see jealousies, manipulation, rivalries, and choices to be made when the main attractions in the show come to understand they are just employees under the thumb of the owner. The reader learns quite a bit about horsemanship, shooting, showmanship, costumes and dress. Regardless of how the author adjusts the real world to tell her story, the life and times of Annie Oakley are vividly brought to life in a way that cannot be replicated by histories. Annie is depicted as a woman ahead of her times – brave, adventurous, willing to shoulder responsibility, and full of life. She is loyal to a fault. Readers will have no problem identifying with Annie and recognizing that her decisions, like their own, are sometimes made for all the wrong reasons. Supporting characters in the story are larger than life as are the real-world figures they represent.

Girl with a Gun is a major prize winner that bears your investigation. The book is very readable with a nice pace and short chapters. The major events of the story take place during April 1885 with the denouement occurring a few months later. There are some great lines worth remembering such as: “And as far as being friendly goes, I’m friendly, all right – just ask the boys.” Read the book. You will not be disappointed. Just ask the boys.”

Buy on Amazon

Girl with a Gun (An Annie Oakley Mystery #1)


Book Excerpts – Girl with a Gun –

“Annie leaned back against the headboard. despite the pain relief powder, her entire body ached, and she wanted more than ever to curl into a tight ball and sleep away her problems. In a few short weeks, she’d left her home, become a famous sharpshooter in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, fallen in love with a legend, witnessed two murders, been shot, and dealt with the possible loss of her beloved horse. Even worse, fate had now spoken.

Annie had no choice. She had to go home.”

 

If you enjoy book excerpts like this, you will love the Annie Oakley Mystery Series.

Find it on Amazon! >> https://amzn.to/37n61P3

 

Book Excerpts HIstorical Fiction Books sleuth award winning kari bovee

Book Excerpts by Kari Bovée

Context:

Fifteen-year-old Annie Oakley is the sole supporter of her widowed mother and two siblings. An expert markswoman and independent spirit, she hunts game to sell to the local mercantile to make ends meet instead of accepting a marriage proposal that could solve all her problems.

After a stunning performance in a shooting contest against the handsome and famous sharpshooter Frank Butler, Annie is offered a position in the renowned Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Finally, she has a chance to save the nearly foreclosed family farm and make her dreams come true. But then her Indian assistant is found dead in her tent, and Annie is dubious when the local coroner claims the death was due to natural causes. When another innocent is murdered, Annie begins to fear the deaths are related to her. And to make matters worse, her prized horse, Buck, a major part of her act, is stolen.

Annie soon discovers that the solution to her problems lies buried in a padlocked Civil War trunk belonging to the show’s manager, Derence LeFleur. And so, with the help of a sassy, blue-blooded reporter, Annie sets out to find her horse, solve the murders, and clear her name.

 Buy on Amazon

Olive Thomas: Her high powered life and mysterious death

After winning The Most Beautiful Girl in New York City contest in 1914, Olive Thomas’ life would change forever. Her win led her to become a popular artists and illustrators model and she appeared on numerous magazine covers including The Saturday Evening Post.

Her beauty captured the eye of Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., and he hired her to perform in his wildly popular Ziegfeld Follies, and later his more risqué show The Midnight Frolic.

In 1916, she began a career in silent films. She also met and married Jack Pickford, the younger brother of silent film star Mary Pickford. Four years later, she died while on a second honeymoon with Pickford in Paris, France. News of her hospitalization and death were the subject of speculation in the press, and has been cited as one of the first publicized Hollywood scandals.

Was her death an accident? Suicide? Or Murder? The world may never know!


Fanny Brice – Ziegfeld’s Funniest Lady

Famous funny lady, Fanny Brice, was one of the many stars who got her start in the Ziegfeld Follies.

Born with a gift for comedy, an excellent singing voice, and plenty of acting chops, Fanny Brice took the world by storm.

From humble beginnings and a less-than enviable love life, Fanny rose to mega-stardom. She will forever be remembered through two films made about her, Funny Girl and Funny Lady, starring the incomparable, Barbara Streisand.

You can learn more about this early 20th century dynamo in the video below. You can also read about her in this post I wrote in May! Enjoy!

 

historical mystery book Grace in the wings Kari Bovee

Are you a historical fiction fan? Do you love the Roaring Twenties and a strong female lead? Check out my latest novel, Grace in the Wings!


 

Billie Burke & Judy Garland

Ziegfeld’s Girl – Actress Billie Burke

Who was Glinda the Good Witch?

Watch this video and learn about actress, Billie Burke who was forever immortalized as the enchanting witch, Glinda, in the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz.

Married to the famous Broadway showman, Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., she had an amazing career of her own on stage and screen.

Just tap your heels three times, click on the arrow, sit back, relax and watch this ten minute video!

historical mystery book Grace in the wings Kari Bovee

Are you a historical fiction fan? Do you love the Roaring Twenties and a strong female lead? Check out my latest novel, Grace in the Wings!

 


 

Seven Fascinating Facts About Hawaii’s Last Royal Heir – Princess Ka’iulani

Referred to as “The People’s Princess,” “The Tragic Princess,” “The Peacock Princess,” and “The Island Rose,” Princess Ka’iulani is one of Hawaii’s most beloved royal Princesses. Born in 1875,  this amazing young woman  lived her life with heart, passion, and a sense of duty to her native land. Unfortunately, her destiny to rule would be cut short  by the abrupt end of her family’s legacy, and the end of an age. Here are some fascinating facts about this young Hawaiian heroine.

#1)  She was the first ‘hapa haole’ (half western/white) heir to the Hawaiian throne.

Born to Princess Miriam Likelike, sister of King Kalakaua and Queen Lili’uokalani, and the Scottish financier, Archibald Scott Cleghorn, Victoria Ka’iulani’s birth was a gift to the Islands. Kaʻiulani was named after her maternal aunt Anna Ka’iulani, and Queen Victoria of England who helped restore the independence of the Kingdom of Hawaii during King Kamehameha III’s reign.

She was christened Princess Victoria Ka‘iulani Kawekio I Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn at St. Andrews Catherdral in Honolulu with the King and Her Highness Ke’elikolani standing in as godparents. After the christening, the King hosted an elaborate celebration at the Iolani Palace in Honolulu. Upon her birth, Kaʻiulani was gifted the estate of ‘Ainahau in Waikiki where she grew up with her parents and three half-sisters from her father’s first marriage.

#2)  She was an accomplished athlete, musician and artist.

Growing up in the paradise of ‘Ainahau (which means ‘cool land’), the Princess spent much of her time outdoors. She loved to ride her pony, Fairy, and also excelled in swimming, surfing, and dancing the hula. She and her half-sister Annie would often play the ukulele and sing for visiting dignitaries and honored guests. Influenced by her mother’s lady-in-waiting, art enthusiast and painter Isobel Strong, and the landscape artist Joseph Dwight Strong, the Princess developed an interest in painting. While pursuing her education in Europe, she took several trips to Scotland and France to study. While in school she also enjoyed many hours of tennis and cricket.

#3)  She loved peacocks.

The birds, native to India, were highly prized in Victorian England. Ka’iulani’s godmother, Princess Ruth Ke`elikolani, gifted the young princess with a small flock of the birds called pikake in Hawaiian. They soon became favored pets of Ka’iulani and her fondness of them was so great, she was sometimes referred to as The Peacock Princess. She also adored the white blooms and fragrance of Arabian jasmine, also native to India, and the flowers also became known as pikake. Today, a small park that was once part of her family’s estate is graced with a statue of Ka’iulani feeding her beloved peacocks.

#4)  She received a British education.

As future Queen to the Hawaiian throne, an well-rounded education was extremely import for the Princess. After discussions among the King, the cabinet minister Mr. Lorin Thurston, and her father, it was decided that thirteen-year-old Victoria would to pursue a private education at Great Harrowden Hall in Northhamptonshire.

Prior to her departure, Honolulu was honored with a visit from the famed author Robert Louis Stevenson. The royal family welcomed him with open arms and he became close with the King and Ka’iulani’s father. To help ease the anxiety of leaving her home for the first time, Stevenson told the Princess tales of her father’s homeland, and of great Celtic Warrior Queens. He also gifted her with a poem that he wrote in her autograph book.

Forth from her land to mine she goes,

The island maid, the island rose,

Light of heart and bright of face:

The daughter of a double race.

Her islands here in southern sun

Shall mourn their Ka’iulani gone,

And I, in her dear banyan shade,

Look vainly for my little maid.

But our Scots islands far away

Shall glitter with unwanted day,

And cast for once their tempest by

To smile in Ka’iulani’s eye.

Ka’iulani and her older half-sister Annie, with whom she was closest, traveled to England to pursue their education for one year. However, for the princess, one year became four. She excelled in her studies of Latin, Literature, Mathematics and History. She took courses in French, German, and English, and art.

#5)  She was an impassioned advocate against the annexation of Hawaii.

During Ka’iulani’s years abroad, there was much unrest in Hawaii. Her uncle, King Kalakaua, died in 1891, and her aunt, Princess Lili’uokalani, became queen. The new queen appointed Ka’iulani as her heir, making her Crown Princess of Hawaii. In 1893, the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown and her aunt was deposed. The movement to annex Hawaii to the United States was in part lead by Lorrin Thurston, the very man who took part in the decision to prepare Ka’iulani for her future life as queen.

In an attempt to fight the overthrow of her kingdom, Ka’iulani traveled to Washington to plead “for my throne, my nation, and my flag.” Upon her arrival she made a statement to the press:

“Seventy years ago, Christian America sent over Christian men and women to give religion and civilization to Hawaii. Today, three of the sons of those missionaries are at your capitol asking you to undo their father’s work. Who sent them? Who gave them the authority to break the Constitution which they swore they would uphold? Today, I, a poor weak girl with not one of my people with me and all these ‘Hawaiian’ statesmen against me, have strength to stand up for the rights of my people. Even now I can hear their wail in my heart and it gives me strength and courage and I am strong – strong in the faith of God, strong in the knowledge that I am right, strong in the strength of seventy million people who in this free land will hear my cry and will refuse to let their flag cover dishonor to mine!”

She also met with President Grover Cleveland to plead her case. Impressed with the seventeen year old Princess, President Cleveland agreed to reassess the situation in Hawaii. However, in the end, the annexation took place, much to the devastation of the Princess.

#6)  She died at 23 years of age.

After the overthrow of the Hawaiian royal family, Princess Ka’iulani’s health began to deteriorate. A family friend stated that the weakness of her heart was due to shock, the direct consequence of her promised kingdom being wrenched away from her. On a happier note, she became engaged to the Hawaiian Prince David Kawananakoa, and the couple made plans for a joyous celebration.

Despite her weakness, the princess continued to partake of swimming, surfing, and other outdoor activities. But, when she was caught in a thunderstorm while riding horseback in Waimea while visiting the Island of Hawaii, she became ill and never recovered. She died on March 6, 1899 of “inflammatory rheumatism” to the heart-break of her fiancé, her family, and the Hawaiian people.

#7)  A movie was made about her.

A dramatized movie of her life was released in 2009. The film’s original title, “The Barbarian Princess,” was very controversial, and hearkened back to the pro-annexation press referring to her as a half-breed, or “dusky” or “heathen.” The title was changed several times and was finally released as “Princess Kaiulani.”

 

historical mystery book Grace in the wings Kari Bovee

 

Are you a historical fiction fan? Do you love the Roaring Twenties and a strong female lead? Check out my latest novel, Grace in the Wings!


Fanny Brice

Women in Show Business History – Fanny Brice, Funny lady

Fanny Brice (sometimes spelled Fannie) was born on New York’s lower east side in 1891 as Fania Borach. She was the third child of Hungarian/Jewish saloon owners, but her interests were not in the family business. At fourteen years old, she made her stage debut during amateur night at Keeny’s Theater in Brooklyn. Shortly after, she started working in burlesque reviews as a singer and comedian.

In 1910 while performing in a burlesque show, she was noticed by famous show-man, Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. After the show, he approached her back stage and said he wanted to put her under contract for his Ziegfeld Follies. Fanny agreed and thus began her long association with the popular entertainment icon. She performed in seven Follies between 1910 and 1923 and in several Midnight Frolic editions 1915 to 1921. In the 1921 Follies she was featured singing “My Man.” Wildly popular, the song became her signature hit.

Brice as Snooks
biography.com

Brice was most famous for her character, Baby Snooks. She performed as Baby in the 1934 Follies. Fanny and Snooks then hit the airwaves in radio at CBS and The Baby Snooks Show was featured weekly till 1948. In 1944, Brice got her own half-hour show on CBS and earned $6,000 a week. Brice was so invested in Snooks, she would often do her radio performances in costume, even though her audience couldn’t see her.

Completely devoted to the character, she told biographer Norman Katov: “Snooks is just the kid I used to be. She’s my kind of youngster, the type I like. She has imagination. She’s eager. She’s alive. With all her deviltry, she is still a good kid, never vicious or mean. I love Snooks, and when I play her I do it as seriously as if she were real. I am Snooks. For twenty minutes or so, Fanny Brice ceases to exist.”

Brice was married three times, first to a local barber, in her teens. The marriage lasted three days before she sued for divorce. Her second husband, known as the love of her life, Nicky Arnstein, was a lady’s man, professional gambler, and white collar criminal. Arnstein served fourteen months in Sing Sing for wiretapping and Brice visited him in prison every week. In 1918 they married, after living together for six years. In 1924 Arnstein was charged in a Wall Street bond theft , was convicted, and sentenced to Leavenworth Federal Prison where he served three years. Upon his release, he never returned to Fanny and their two children. She divorced him and then married Billy Rose, a songwriter and stage producer. Her third marriage, too, ended in divorce.

Fanny Brice | Kari Bovee | Empowered Women in History

Fanny’s career was long and varied. She worked as a song “model”, comedian, singer, theater and movie actress. She starred in many films, two in which she plays herself, The Great Ziegfeld (1934) and The Ziegfeld Follies, (1936.) She recorded several songs for Victor and Columbia. After her death, she posthumously received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award for her 1921 recording of “My Man.”

At the age of 59, Fanny Brice died on May 29, 1951, of a cerebral hemorrhage, in Hollywood, California, depriving the world of her varied and abundant talents. She is most famously portrayed in the movies Funny Girl (1968) and Funny Lady (1975) by the incredibly talented, Barbara Streisand.

 

historical mystery book Grace in the wings Kari Bovee

Are you a historical fiction fan? Do you love the Roaring Twenties and a strong female lead? Check out my latest novel, Grace in the Wings!

 


Women in Show Business History – Clara Bow, It Girl

Named the first ever “It girl,” Clara Bow, America’s favorite flapper, made a huge impact in the roaring twenties and was known as one of the decade’s leading sex symbols.

Raised as an only child, (her two siblings before her died) Clara’s survival is nothing short of miraculous. The doctors warned Sarah Frances (Gordon) Bow, and Robert Walter Bow, not to have another child after the death of the first two. But Clara was destined for the world and was born one hot July day in 1905. A survivor from birth, Clara would spend the rest of her days fighting for her dreams of a good life and stardom.

Her existence was tough from the get-go as her parents, suffering from poverty, struggled to make ends meet. Her father stayed away from home most of the time, and when he returned, often verbally and physically abused (by some accounts)  his wife and Clara. Clara, outcast by the other girls because of her ragged clothes, carrot-colored hair, and tomboy ways much preferred the company of boys.

Often lonely and unhappy, Clara sought to escape from her fractious home life by going to the movies. She said of these forays into the darkened theater, “For the first time in my life I knew there was beauty in the world.”

Clara BowAt sixteen years old, she decided to pursue a career in film. Her father, probably seeing dollar signs in his future, encouraged her, but her mother did not agree with the decision. Against her mother’s wishes and at the urging of her father, Clara entered a nationwide acting contest called “Fame and Fortune” sponsored by a Brewster’s Publications Magazine in 1921.

Showing up in her tomboyish sweater, lackluster skirt, and with absolutely no experience, Clara’s chances of winning were slim. But when she turned on the emotion, she won the judges over. She walked away with a silver trophy and an evening gown. The magazine’s publisher vowed to help her secure roles in film, but nothing happened despite her father’s relentless pressure to pursue the offer. Finally, a female director named Christy Cabanne cast her in a movie called Beyond the Rainbow released in 1922.

After the contest, Clara dropped out of high school to pursue her dreams. Her work in Beyond the Rainbow led to another role in a movie called Down to the Sea in Ships. Clara felt she was on her way, but then tragedy struck. Her mother, suffering from psychosis and epilepsy, brought on by a head injury in her youth, struggled with her mental health. The roles of mother and daughter gradually became reversed and Clara, as a young girl, tried her best to take care of her mother during and after her epileptic fits. Her often absent father offered little help and left Clara alone to deal with her mother’s erratic fits of rage and temper. One night, during one of Sarah’s rages, Clara woke up to her mother holding a knife at her throat, screaming at her. Clara’s father soon had Sarah committed, separating the two. Even though Clara knew this act was in her best interest, it still caused her great distress. In 1923, Sarah died from her epilepsy.

That same year, Clara left her father and New York and headed for Hollywood. She secured several other silent film roles and charmed audiences with her perky personality and her natural,  bold sexuality. Her roles were comprised of working-class girls, showgirls, manicurists, etc. who had big ambitions in life. These characters often flew in the face of societal and sexual convention and pursued the life of partygoing, independence, and freedom. She portrayed the perfect, adorable and charming “flapper” and the motion picture world took notice.

In 1926 she signed her first big movie contract with Paramount Pictures, and in1927 she landed the role of poor, shop-girl Betty Lou Spence in the movie It, adapted from the novella written by author Elinor Glyn. The movie was an instant box office success and Clara Bow became Paramount’s most popular star, and America’s first “It girl.”

Clara Bow evening gownClara starred in 46 silent films, and despite her heavy Brooklyn accent and marginal singing voice, transitioned to “talkies” and starred in eleven more motion pictures. Her star burned bright, but at age 26, the actress burned out under the tremendous pressure put on her by the studios and her demanding schedule. She also showed signs of mental instability, much like her mother, no doubt brought on by her stressful career. Due to her status as a sex symbol, Clara was also the subject of many scandals. Women, jealous of the actress’s natural sex appeal often accused her publically of husband stealing. Although she had affairs with many men during her heyday, “husband stealing” was not in her repertoire.

In 1931, Clara retired from acting and married Rex Bell, a rancher from Texas. She dropped out of Hollywood and went to live with him on his ranch to recuperate. After returning to health, she re-entered Hollywood with a bang. Everyone wanted her. She signed a contract with Fox Film Corporation for a two-picture deal. Both films, Savage and Hoop-La were well received. She officially retired from acting two years later and devoted her life to her husband and sons.

But, Clara could not escape her demons. Her gradual slide into mental illness culminated in a suicide attempt in 1944. She checked herself into a psychiatric institute in 1949 where she was diagnosed with schizophrenia and treated with electric shock therapy. When she was released, she did not return to the ranch but instead bought a modest bungalow where she lived out the rest of her days until she succumbed to a heart attack in 1965.

Clara Bow found a way out of her lonely childhood to become one of America’s best-loved film icons and the highest paid actress of her day. She influenced some of the most powerful people in Hollywood, and also the common woman who wanted to personify the loveable flapper with her “Clara Bow heart-shaped lips” and her charming down-to-earth realism and individuality. She will live on in the hearts and minds of many through the multitudes of photographs taken of her and what remains of her silent and “talking” films.

historical mystery book Grace in the wings Kari Bovee

Are you a historical fiction fan? Do you love the Roaring Twenties and a strong female lead? Check out my latest novel, Grace in the Wings!

 

Repost from Empowered Women in History, 2018

 


SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave